National Teens Don’t Text and Drive Week

  •  Five seconds is the average time your eyes are off the road while texting. When traveling at 55mph, that’s enough time to cover the length of a football field. (2009, VTTI)
  • Of those killed in distracted-driving-related crashed, 995 involved reports of a cell phone as a distraction (18% of fatalities in distraction-related crashes). (NHTSA)
  • Using a cell phone while driving, whether it’s handheld or hands-free, delays a driver’s reactions as much as having a blood alcohol concentration at the legal limit of .08 percent. (2009, University of Utah)
  • In 2011, 3,331 people were killed in crashes involving a distracted driver, compared to 3,267 in 2010. An additional, 387,000 people were injured in motor vehicle crashes involving a distracted driver, compared to 416,000 injured in 2010.
  • 10% of injury crashes in 2011 were reported as distraction-affected crashes.
  • As of December 2012, 171.3 billion text messages were sent in the US (includes PR, the Territories, and Guam) every month. (CTIA)
  • 11% of all drivers under the age of 20 involved in fatal crashes were reported as distracted at the time of the crash. This age group has the largest proportion of drivers who were distracted.
  • For drivers 15-19 years old involved in fatal crashes, 21 percent of the distracted drivers were distracted by the use of cell phones (NHTSA)

Don’t become a statistic.  Here’s how you can keep yourself and others safe when you’re out on the road:

  1. Take the Pledge Commit to being a safe, distraction-free driver.  Print out the pledge form, fill it in, and keep it in your car or locker as a reminder to stay off the phone when you’re driving.
  2. Be Seen Share a “Faces of Distracted Driving” video on Facebook or Twitter to let your friends know about the consequences of cell phone use behind the wheel.  Change your social networking profile picture to remind your friends that “One Text or Call Could Wreck It All.”
  3. Speak Up Don’t stop at being a great driver – be a great passenger!  Make sure to call out your friends, and even your parents, if you see them using a cell phone behind the wheel.
  4. Spread the Word Get involved in promoting safe driving in your community.  Hang up posters, host an event on distracted driving, or start a SADD (Students Against Destructive Decisions) chapter at your school.

Stop The Texts. Stop The Wrecks. Videos